Emily Reichert

Greentown Labs

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Emily Reichert serves as Chief Executive Officer of Greentown Labs, the largest climatetech incubator in North America. As the organization’s first employee, Emily spearheaded the rapid growth of Greentown Labs, incubating hundreds of climate-focused startups that have created thousands of jobs and attracted partners from around the world. Today, Greentown Labs has grown to 35 employees managing a community of nearly 200 startups across two locations – Somerville, MA (HQ) and Houston, TX. Emily started her career at Arthur D. Little as a Ph.D. scientist and progressed into R&D, business development and general management roles. Prior to Greentown Labs, she was the Director of Business Operations at the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry where she helped grow the angel-funded startup into a sustainable contract R&D business with a mission to minimize environmental impact of chemical products. Emily has been appointed to leadership positions on innovation, economic development, entrepreneurship, and clean technology commercialization at the city, state, and federal level including the City of Somerville’s Chamber of Commerce, the Massachusetts Governor’s Economic Development Planning Council, the Massachusetts Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative, and the U.S. Secretary of Commerce’s National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. She holds a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and earned her MBA from MIT Sloan School of Management.

Sessions With Emily Reichert

Thursday, 10 March

  • 12:30pm - 01:10pm (CST) / 10/mar/2022 06:30 pm - 10/mar/2022 07:10 pm

    Advancing Energy Innovation: Growth of the ecosystem

    Panel Innovation & Technology

    Originating in the Silicon Valley, the term “Innovation Ecosystem is the evolving set of actors, activities, and artifacts, and the institutions and relations, including complementary and substitute relations, that are important for the innovative performance of an actor or a population of actors.” Creating energy sector innovation ecosystems has been challenging due to a multitude of participants, access to capital, role of governments, and challenges scaling promising technologies. With the need to develop and scale new technologies to achieve net zero by 2050, energy innovation will be the linchpin. What are critical factors for creating successful clean energy/tech innovation centers? Where are the most successful cleantech innovation ecosystems, and what makes them successful? Does the nature of the energy system make it less receptive to new ideas and innovations? How could governments incentivize these ecosystems? How could the pace of knowledge transfer be accelerated from innovation to deployment? With future growth in energy demand and investments centered in developing countries, how can new ecosystems be created in these countries?