Stéphane Michel

TotalEnergies

President, Gas, Renewables & Power

A graduate of the Ecole Polytechnique (1994) and the Ecole des Mines in Paris (1997). After serving as Energy Advisor to the French Finance Minister (2002-2004), Stéphane Michel joined the Group in 2005, working as Business Development Manager for Total Downstream Asia, based in Singapore. In 2008, Stéphane Michel, is appointed Total E&P Qatar JV Business Development Manager and in 2010 Managing Director of Total E&P Libya. In 2011, he became Total E&P Qatar Managing Director and on April 1, 2014, the E&P Senior Vice President Middle East/North Africa and a Member of the Management Committee of the Exploration and Production segment. On March 1, 2021 Stéphane Michel is appointed President of Gas, Renewables and Power segment and Member of the Executive Committee.

Sessions With Stéphane Michel

Monday, 7 March

  • 02:10pm - 02:50pm (CST) / 07/mar/2022 08:10 pm - 07/mar/2022 08:50 pm

    Strategies to Get to Net Zero

    Panel Markets/Economics/Strategy

    In “Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector,” IEA stated that net zero by 2050 requires “nothing short of a total transformation of the energy system that underpins our economies,” and “the pathway is narrow but achievable.” The last 24 months has seen a groundswell of net-zero commitments by countries emitting over 90% of GHG. Corporate strategies increasingly recognize the net-zero goal. Meanwhile, after the 2020 pandemic-induced drop, global GHG concentrations increase and annual emissions rise. Net zero by OECD countries and major companies is necessary but insufficient. Can the global economy grow while emissions decline? In order to achieve net zero targets, emissions need to decline within this decade in emerging economies. Is this feasible? Can decarbonization accelerate in the power sector? When can power sector GHG emissions approach zero in OECD and in developing countries? Oil has been the major transportation fuel; transport sector emissions continue to increase. How far can the transport sector be electrified?