Peter Gardett

S&P Global

Executive Director, Climate and Cleantech

Peter Gardett is an executive director for S&P Global and is part of a dedicated research team that provides integrated climate and cleantech advisory research to the financial sector. Mr. Gardett has more than 20 years of experience in energy and commodities markets as a journalist, analyst, entrepreneur, and executive. His work at S&P Global focuses on the energy transition and cleantech, including solar, wind, hydrogen, batteries, and storage. Mr. Gardett holds a degree from the University of St Andrews in Scotland and lives in New York City.

Sessions With Peter Gardett

Monday, 7 March

  • 02:00pm - 02:40pm (CST) / 07/mar/2022 08:00 pm - 07/mar/2022 08:40 pm

    Innovations in Clean Tech Financing: Are investors ready & willing?

    Panel Innovation & Technology

    Investor demand for clean tech assets has been a leading indicator for company-level action on energy transition strategies. With higher commodity prices attracting renewed interest in the role of oil and gas companies as energy transition drivers, investors have once again reengaged with elements of the industry that were difficult to fund only months ago. What is the balance for clean tech plays versus progress on net-zero approaches at existing firms? How do legacy business models need to change to adapt to investor concerns about the pace of the energy transition? How can companies better communicate with investors on clean tech deployment strategies, and how can investors speak the language of industry operators?

  • 04:00pm - 04:40pm (CST) / 07/mar/2022 10:00 pm - 07/mar/2022 10:40 pm

    Through the Energy Transition Capital Stack: Venture, debt, equity, asset finance & beyond

    Panel Finance & Investment/Trading & Risk Management/ESG

    Venture capital (VC) firms got burned ten years ago trying to leverage a consumer-business model into the capital-intensive energy sector. As VC firms have grown, their appetite for making larger, transformative investments has returned. Many investments are stretching the bounds of traditional capital stack structure, with asset deployment-focused investors supporting VC-backed companies, corporate VC leveraging parent company balance sheets and networks, and infrastructure financers finding new ways to work with early-stage technology firms. How do recent investments in climate and clean tech stretch the ordinary bounds of energy investing? Will institutional investors redefine the market? With private equity increasingly comfortable with technology risk and VC increasingly comfortable with scale, how do energy companies differentiate between their counterparties and competitors?

Tuesday, 8 March

  • 11:40am - 12:30pm (CST) / 08/mar/2022 05:40 pm - 08/mar/2022 06:30 pm

    How Is the Capital Transition Changing the Energy Business?

    Panel Finance & Investment/Trading & Risk Management/ESG

    Capital allocation for the energy sector has undergone a sweeping reorientation in the past two years. The shift is more complex than moving into cleantech and out of fossil fuels, incorporating increasingly sophisticated understanding of climate risk and intense engagement with shifting value within business models. Having raised huge volumes of capital for energy transition plays in the last two years, investors and their counterparts are now deploying that money into markets and capital expenditures (Capex), presaging significant shifts across the energy ecosystem. What is the current state of energy transition investing? How does the investment horizon influence sectoral focus in analyzing investments or deploying capital? Does cleantech benefit from longer investment horizons? What level of returns are currently found in cleantech or clean infrastructure? What can we expect a decade from now?

Thursday, 10 March

  • 11:20am - 12:10pm (CST) / 10/mar/2022 05:20 pm - 10/mar/2022 06:10 pm

    Financial Innovation’s Growing Role in Climate & Cleantech

    Panel Finance & Investment/Trading & Risk Management/ESG
    The architecture of financial markets is transforming in response to a double-sided helix of compounding risk-reward evolutions. On the one side, an energy sector that is more distributed, more intermittent, and potentially more volatile is prompting the emergence of new financial instruments and trading approaches that help investors and companies price and hedge the growing share of cleantech in their portfolios. On the other strand, the rising tide of climate-risk awareness is being steadily and progressively priced into financial risk models, with regulators around the world waking up to the demands of investors and financiers for high-quality comparable data and strategic signposts. How are cleantech and climate-linked fixed-income instruments rapidly evolving? What are new ways of parsing equity valuations? What is the role of carbon pricing in this innovative area of financial and capital markets?