Alan Armstrong

Williams

President & Chief Executive Officer

Alan Armstrong became president and chief executive officer of Williams in January 2011. During his tenure, Williams has expanded its reach, currently handling about 30 percent of all U.S. natural gas volumes through gathering, processing, transportation and storage services. Before being named CEO, Armstrong led the company’s North American midstream and olefins businesses through a period of growth and expansion as Senior Vice President – Midstream. He has held several progressive leadership positions since joining the company in 1986 as an engineer. He serves on the board of directors of the American Petroleum Institute and the Energy Infrastructure Council, where he co-chaired a working group to develop the first-ever Midstream Company ESG Reporting Template. He is a member of the National Petroleum Council and in 2019 chaired the Council’s Energy Infrastructure Study on Changing Dynamics of Oil & Gas Infrastructure. Armstrong is a member of the Business Roundtable and serves on the board of directors of BOK Financial Corporation, as well as several education-focused organizations. Armstrong graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. 

SESSIONS WITH Alan Armstrong

Wednesday, 3 March

  • 11:00am - 11:30am (CST) / 03/mar/2021 05:00 pm - 03/mar/2021 05:30 pm

    Plenary

    Building Tomorrow's North American Infrastructure

    Panel Innovation & Technology Transportation & Mobility

    The business of building energy infrastructure has grown in complexity in recent years. Recent disruptions have emphasized the need for reliable services and the importance of market design to create the incentives for investments that boost resilience. At the same time, midstream developers are under increasing scrutiny to raise their ESG standards and align their operating models with the buy-in of a project’s many stakeholders. What role can midstream companies play in advancing energy transition? Where is the disconnect between energy infrastructure required and the capital needed to develop it? How are companies and capital providers assessing the risks of project opposition?