Adam Sieminski

KAPSARC

President

Adam Sieminski is President of the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center. KAPSARC is an independent, non-profit, research think tank located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Its mission is to advance the understanding of energy, economics, and the environment, while acting as a catalyst for dialogue on issues of importance to policy makers and the public. Prior to joining KAPSARC in 2018, Mr. Sieminski held the James Schlesinger Chair for Energy and Geopolitics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC. CSIS is one of the world’s preeminent international policy institutions focused on security, regional studies, and transnational challenges including energy, trade, and global development. Mr. Sieminski served as Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical division of the U.S. Department of Energy, during 2012-16. While awaiting U.S. Senate confirmation for the EIA appointment, he was the Senior Director for Energy and Environment of the U.S. National Security Council at the White House. He was previously Deutsche Bank’s chief energy economist and integrated oil company analyst, working in London, New York, and Washington. Mr. Sieminski is an active member of the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE), a Senior Fellow and former President of the U.S. Association for Energy Economics (USAEE), and was President of the National Association of Petroleum Investment Analysts. Mr. Sieminski holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation. He earned both an undergraduate degree in civil engineering and a master's degree in public administration from Cornell University.

Sessions With Adam Sieminski

Monday, 1 March

  • 07:30am - 08:00am (CST) / 01/mar/2021 01:30 pm - 01/mar/2021 02:00 pm

    Strategic Dialogue

    CCUS Emerging Business Models

    Panel Clean Tech Innovation & Technology Upstream Oil & Gas
    Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) is seen as playing a vital role in all decarbonization scenarios. Yet, CCUS as an answer to climate change is at a nascent stage: for example, in the United States, most CO2­ for CCUS comes from natural rather than anthropogenic sources. While there is certainly great potential for large-scale implementation of CCUS, many challenges still need to be overcome for this to happen. Today, the technological, competitive, and regulatory landscape is rapidly evolving.