2016 Agenda

  • Monday, 22 February
  • Tuesday, 23 February
  • Wednesday, 24 February
  • Thursday, 25 February
  • Friday, 26 February
  • 1:10pm
    Monday, 22 February
    1:10pm - 1:50pm
    Welcome & Opening Dialogue

    IHS CERAWeek Conference Opening & Special Address

  • 1:50pm
    Monday, 22 February
    1:50pm - 2:30pm
    Plenary

    Energy Markets in Turmoil: The Shape of Things to Come

  • 3:10pm
    Monday, 22 February
    3:10pm - 4:00pm
    Global Plenary Dialogue

    Energy Strategies After COP

  • 4:00pm
    Monday, 22 February
    4:00pm - 4:50pm
    Global Plenary Dialogue

    Financing the Energy Future

  • 4:50pm
    Monday, 22 February
    4:50pm - 5:40pm
    Global Plenary Dialogue

    Navigating the Storm

  • 5:40pm
    Monday, 22 February
    5:40pm - 6:30pm
    Global Plenary Dialogue

    Leading Through the Cycle

  • 6:30pm
    Monday, 22 February
    6:30pm - 7:30pm
    Welcome Reception

  • 9:30am
    Tuesday, 23 February
    9:30am - 10:00am
    Oil Keynote

    Opening Oil Address

  • 10:00am
    Tuesday, 23 February
    10:00am - 10:30am
    Oil Keynote

    Oil Keynote

  • 10:30am
    Tuesday, 23 February
    10:30am - 11:15am
    CEO Dialogue

    CEO Plenary

  • 11:30am
    Tuesday, 23 February
    11:30am - 12:40pm
    Strategic Dialogues

    Strategic Dialogues provide insights and presentations on key strategic topics; followed by interactive discussion among the presenters and between session participants and panelists.

    NOC Strategies for a New World

    There has not been a uniform response from national oil companies (NOCs) to low oil and gas prices. For some it is a signal to expand, for some a need to pull back to address growing domestic energy sector challenges, and for others a challenge to survival. How do NOCs view the challenges of today and tomorrow?

    Operational Strategies: Driving Value & Safety in World of Uncertainty

    The global energy industry has an imperative to deliver health, safety, and environmental (HSE) performance while maintaining operational integrity. Today, all companies face a common challenge. How will they maintain adequate resource levels to ensure that their operations run safely and productively while managing the implications of a cost-constrained world? And what role will technology play in supporting ever-tightening resource availability? This session will explore strategies that integrated energy companies and their suppliers are using to achieve asset reliability, greater productivity, and reduced risk of HSE incidents.

    Mexico’s Strategies to Attract Upstream Investment & Technology: Unleashing the Potential

    Mexico’s landmark changes to its upstream industry are an important and ongoing development for the world oil industry.

    • How has it unfolded so far and what does the future hold?
    • How do Mexico’s resources compete with other international prospects?
    • What fiscal terms will make Mexico competitive in a low price environment?
    • Will Mexico’s contract terms give investors confidence in legal stability and the rule of law?
    • How will environmental and safety standards be implemented, and can companies keep their implementation schedules on track?
    • Can the Mexican supply chain and potential private partners help bring down costs and increase efficiency?

    North American Upstream: The Landscape to 2020

    The dynamism of the North American upstream  industry altered the course of the global oil market. Upstream market dynamics in 2016 are much more challenging. But market and competitive conditions never stand still. What does the future hold for the North American upstream industry to 2020 in terms of investment, industry structure, and growth?

    IOC Strategies for Differentiation & Growth

    Over the past several years, the previously differentiated business models of larger international oil companies (IOCs), independents and North American pure players have been on a convergent path. While all companies are cutting costs and reviewing organizational processes, the issue of competitive differentiation in the future remains. This panel will discuss how various IOCs are positioning for future success.

    Future of Global Refining: Changing Role of Refining Centers

    The Middle East, North America, and parts of Asia are home to increasingly vital refining centers for the global oil industry. New, large scale refineries combined with well-established sophisticated refinery capacity are turning regional downstream competition into a global race. Will refining centers increasingly dominate global trade—or are there opportunities for refineries outside of these clusters?

    Financing Upstream Investment: Who, What & How Much?

    Access to capital was an essential driver of the great revival of US oil production. In today’s market, is access to capital changing? And who will provide the capital for upstream investment in the years ahead?

    The Disruptors: The Future of Mobility & What it Means

    Information technology companies are seeking new roles in the transport industry that could disrupt the nature of personal mobility—changing consumer preferences for when to drive, what to drive, and how to drive. At the same time, automotive incumbents are aggressively working to stay competitive and meet consumers’ high expectations. Battery advances, autonomous vehicles, and mobile software also point to the possibility of a transport future very different from the past. With big changes ahead, this session will explore what implications this may have for both the automotive and energy industries.

    The Middle East: A Transition to What?

    Many of the relationships that defined the Middle East for the past several decades are in transition—or do not even exist anymore. The bloody war in Syria, the Iranian nuclear deal, the fight against ISIS, and the impact of lower oil revenue are shifting the playing field but clouding outcomes. What lies ahead for the Middle East?

    Global Oil Market Outlook

    Should we expect oil prices to remain low for many years—or is a  move to higher prices in the offing? OPEC policy, world oil demand, and the impact of lower upstream spending on supply are among the major question marks.

  • 12:50pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    12:50pm - 2:00pm
    Luncheon & Dialogue

    Luncheon & Keynote: What’s Different This Time?

  • 2:15pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    2:15pm - 3:00pm
    Ministerial Dialogue

    Ministerial Plenary

  • 3:00pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    3:00pm - 3:30pm

    CEO Dialogue

  • 3:30pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    3:30pm - 4:00pm
    Plenary Dialogue

    IHS Oil Watch: How Resilient is Supply?

  • 4:20pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    4:20pm - 5:30pm
    Concurrent Plenaries

    Downstream Plenary

    Upstream Plenary

  • 5:40pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    5:40pm - 6:20pm
    IHS Expert Discussions

    IHS Expert Discussions provide presentations and outlooks by IHS analysts, followed by interactive discussion in an informal setting. Each session provides insight on strategies, risk, and opportunities in a key energy area. Sessions follow Chatham House rules. 

    Low Oil Prices: Impact of US Fuel Economy Policy & Demand

    US fuel economy standards are pushing automakers to achieve a 50 mpg new vehicle fuel economy target by 2025. With low oil prices on the horizon, will US consumers value fuel economy and alternative vehicles enough to enable OEMs to achieve this target? This discussion will look at consumer feedback from Strategic Vision and discuss the likelihood of the 2025 CAFE targets being met in a low oil price world.

    Upstream Costs & the Price of Oil

    The price of oil is a fraction of what it was less than two years ago, and possible future price paths are many. In this environment, assessing the outlook for the cost of developing new supply to meet demand growth and offset production declines can shed light on how oil prices may evolve over the longer term. What factors will help shape upstream costs—and oil prices—in the coming years?

    Innovation Pioneer Expert Briefing: Water & Energy

    Navigating the water-energy nexus is a critical issue for every segment of the energy value chain. In the upstream, it comes into play in helping manage costs in the current low oil price environment and securing a long-term license to operate. Likewise, in the power sector new regulations and competition from other sources of demand has made water use a key area of focus. This panel explores the role that entrepreneurs play in stimulating breakthrough technologies and business models to meet these challenges.

    OPEC & the Oil Markets of the Future

    OPEC’s November 2014 decision to not cut production pushed prices lower. Yet the Organization and its members continue to hold the markets attention, and with good reason. This discussion will center on what could drive a decision, and if a post-OPEC world is possible.

    Implications of Advancing Climate Policy on North America’s Upstream Oil & Gas Sector

    Following on COP21, this expert briefing will explore the potential implications for North American climate policy to impact the upstream oil and gas sector. What policies have advanced in North America so far, and what are the prospects for and implications of future climate policies on Canadian and US oil production?

    Government Response to Low Oil Prices

    What have governments done in reaction to lower oil prices? To what degree are fiscal or other regulatory changes being considered or implemented?

    Global Energy Scenarios: Is Radical Change in Energy Demand Coming?

    Energy demand trends are evolving differently than in the past—and could even be on the precipice of dramatic change. Key interest is focused on the largest markets in Asia (China and India), which are expected to be key drivers of the world’s future energy demand growth. In addition to changing economic outlooks, growing social and political concerns about climate change and pollution are key drivers of future demand around the world, abetted by falling costs for renewable energy and signs that batteries could play a growing role in both power and transport. We will use the IHS scenario framework to discuss the future of energy demand in China, India and the world.

    Natural Gas Liquids: Will Exports Balance the US Market?

    The US has become a major exporter of natural gas liquids. Is the US also the “balancer “of the global NGLs market? If so, what are the implications for US and international prices?

    Latin America’s Upstream: Managing Decline versus Growth

    Despite the various opportunities, managing the decline and growth will be critical for Latin America’s upstream strategies. Indeed, each play has its own technical, commercial and above-ground risk challenges in the context of various above ground risks in a low price environment. What is the right balance?

    E&P “Capital Strategies”: Finance & Cash Flow

    The recent fall in oil and gas prices has created uncertainty within the sector that extends not only to operators, but to investors and capital providers as well. The consequences can be seen in the large reductions to upstream capital budgets, the lack of global M&A activity, and limited capital flowing into the sector. What is the impact across differing business models, how are companies going to survive and position themselves to take advantage of the downturn, and what are the catalysts for M&A activity?

  • 6:20pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    6:20pm - 7:30pm
    Conference Wide Reception

  • 7:30pm
    Tuesday, 23 February
    7:30pm - 9:15pm
    Dinner & Keynote

    Future of the Global Economy

  • 7:30am
    Wednesday, 24 February
    7:30am - 8:40am
    Breakfast & Strategic Dialogues

    Strategic Dialogues provide insights and presentations on key strategic topics; followed by interactive discussion among the presenters and between session participants and panelists.

    Innovation for Tomorrow’s Infrastructure: Finance, Policy & Digital Transformation

    Meeting tomorrow's energy demand will require some $50 trillion in infrastructure investment over the next two decades. The majority of this investment will be in non-OECD countries with limited access to investment capital. Meeting these needs will require innovation – including adoption of digital technologies, new financing models and policy leadership. This session will explore the interplay of these, and the challenges and opportunities ahead for energy companies: What steps are required to transform energy infrastructure to be more globally integrated? How will the digital transformation enable step changes? How will large scale infrastructure investment be financed? How can policymakers, technology providers and financial institutions better collaborate to accelerate infrastructure development?

    The Future of Heating & Cooling: Simple but Big Impact?

    Heating and cooling in buildings is the main use of energy in the residential and commercial sectors, accounting for over 60% of energy consumption in most developed markets. Despite its importance it has long been the Cinderella sector with attention focused on other areas, most notably power. This is now changing as technology offers new solutions to provide high levels of comfort while lowering GHG emissions and as policy makers and market participants seek to exploit the emerging synergies between the heat and power sectors. In this session we will discuss the future of the heating and cooling sector, how it can help support global climate objectives and the implications for market participants.

    Accelerating Game Changing Oil & Gas Technologies

    Technology has been a game changer for the upstream industry. In the face of low prices, new regulation and changing market dynamics, this need is even more critical. What role do entrepreneurs and investors play in stimulating breakthrough technologies to meet these challenges?

    North America’s Shift to Gas: Logistics & the New Fuel Dynamic

    The relative cost of coal and gas has shifted radically creating a rivalry to serve power generation demand. The logistics of the two fuels are somewhat different and while this shift has provided benefits and opportunities, it also has introduced new dynamics, complexities, and risks to the fuel delivery systems and optionality/reliability of the power grid. How will the growing role of natural gas in power generation create structural and operational challenges for gas buyers, focusing on pipeline and storage capacity contracting and operations?

    Solving the Gas Squeeze in the Middle East & North Africa: Implications for Exports & Imports

    The continuing growth of gas-fired power, at levels of around 10% per annum in many Gulf countries together with commitments to new gas-intensive industries and to upstream use swelled by enhanced oil recovery projects, has left many countries in MENA facing gas shortages. Several are now importing LNG to balance demand, and others are curtailing LNG exports or industrial use. However, many new gas production initiatives are under way albeit often at much higher costs than for conventional gas, and policy moves to improve efficiency and to reduce subsidies are expected to slow the rate of demand growth. Power generation diversification away from gas (and oil) is also underway with nuclear, coal and large-scale solar projects poised to impact the scene – much of the capacity now potentially interconnected via the GCC Grid and other inter-country transmission. How will all these developments interact to underpin the future of LNG and pipeline gas imports and exports in the region?

    Unlocking Latin America’s Natural Gas Potential

    Natural gas is a growing component of Latin America’s energy mix. A significant gas supply potential exists in the region while energy demand continues to grow region-wide at accelerated rates. However, the challenges remain. LNG is now a permanent fixture in Latin America’s energy plans. What is the region’s potential future gas demand and supply mix?

    New LNG Entrants

    With the global LNG industry is poised for significant expansion, new players are keen to carve out exposure to the business. A growing spot market and the advent of innovative contracts terms has attracted buyers that had not considered LNG just a few years ago. The discovery of several new gas resources basins also provides opportunities for companies to unlock new LNG supply. Despite this emerging dynamism, the industry faces difficult headwinds in the coming years as foundational LNG demand shows signs of weakness. What role will new LNG entrants play in the future of global LNG balance.

    India Gas Demand: What Potential at Lower Price Levels?

    With Asia Gas prices expected available at dramatically lower price levels over the medium term, what sources of new demand can be developed? How will small-scale LNG, CHP, and gas for solar integration feature to deliver demand growth, and what policy actions are needed for it to materialize?

  • 8:50am
    Wednesday, 24 February
    8:50am - 9:25am
    Opening Plenary

    Opening Plenary

  • 9:25am
    Wednesday, 24 February
    9:25am - 10:40am
    Global Gas Plenary

    Global Gas Plenary

  • 10:40am
    Wednesday, 24 February
    10:40am - 11:05am

    CEO Plenary

  • 11:20am
    Wednesday, 24 February
    11:20am - 12:35pm
    Strategic Dialogues

    Strategic Dialogues provide insights and presentations on key strategic topics; followed by interactive discussion among the presenters and between session participants and panelists.

    Future of Offshore E&P – The Play Grab for the Next Generation

    Industry has enormous capital and “strategic intent” invested in the deepwater, deeper plays, HPHT (high pressure, high temperature), other hostile environments, and isolated discoveries divorced from existing infrastructure. Similarly, the business models for many E&P companies are founded on higher risk and often high cost exploration activity. Adding in huge exploration cuts, all higher cost, higher risk developments are in question with respect to remaining viable strategic choices for E&P. Industry must advance cost reduction, project restructuring and de-risking enough in the next five years to foster a lower cost new generation of offshore developments. What new strategic opportunities will this restructuring present for companies to enhance and build portfolios – if they are willing to invest?

    Tightening the Valves on Global Methane Emissions

    Venting and flaring of natural gas occurs throughout the oil and gas supply chain, but several initiatives and regulatory programs are underway to limit these practices which can release large amounts of methane and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These initiatives aim to reduce waste and improve operational emissions during a time when industry is facing increased scrutiny of their climate and environmental impacts . What strategies and technologies will be employed to reduce emissions effectively?

    Energy & Petrochemicals: New Challenges, New Opportunities

    The decline in crude oil prices has raised uncertainties regarding the near term impact in global chemical markets. How future price trends evolve in the coming 12 to 24 months will have a significant impact on regional competitiveness and future decisions regarding new capital investments in the chemical value chain. The decline in crude oil prices over the past year provided welcome competitive relief for the European, Latin American and Asian petrochemical industries, although it also brings with it a number of challenges. Falling crude oil prices reduce feedstock costs for the predominantly naphtha fed industry, however, while lower inputs costs were welcomed, savvy buyers of products and intermediates see the direction of crude and delay buying decisions causing volatility in pricing in many markets. In North America and the Middle East, how will lower crude oil prices impact overall company profitability? Ethane or gas based petrochemical investments in North America do not carry the same high profile ROI as seen in the past five years. How will this impact the pace of approving new investments in North America (and other regions)?

    Future of Asia’s Gas Markets

    Fuel supply choices are being made differently in the well-established markets of Japan and Korea - contrasted with those in developing markets of South and Southeast Asia. Does the coming global gas surplus more widely enable policies for gas to effectively balance power systems and compete with abundant regional coal resources?

    North American Shale–Productivity Progress

    Major strides in drilling and completion efficiency have proved to be a potent counterweight as drilling activity has dropped in response to plunging oil and gas prices over the past two years. How has the greater effectiveness of drilling, improved efficiency of fracking and recompletions, and greater success in identifying sweetspots, reduced costs and enabled production growth in an era of low prices?

    Financing Gas Midstream & Infrastructure Through the Cycle

    The current low oil and gas prices have introduced new challenges for the financing of gas upstream and midstream projects—while also potentially giving rise to new opportunities. In addition, low oil-linked LNG prices have cast a shadow over prospective liquefaction projects in North America and globally. Meanwhile capex budgets are being slashed across the industry, and the sovereign financing capability of key gas-producing countries is also reduced by the low price environment. This situation could create new opportunities for financial investors able to develop financing structures suitable for this environment—and those willing to take on higher levels of risk. What new strategies will evolve to finance tomorrow’s infrastructure needs?

    Rethinking the Global LNG Market

    The long-anticipated LNG supply glut is now becoming a reality and global gas market players are expected to face many commercial challenges over the medium term. History has shown that it becomes increasingly difficult for gas buyers to honour some contractual commitments in a weak market environment with the result that some key contract terms such as price, destination/resale flexibility and volume obligation will come under intense scrutiny. Industry stakeholders will need to achieve some form of compromise if the longer term development of the international gas business is to be assured. This session will examine the scope for compromise amongst key industry stakeholders and the parameters under which future gas pricing and contract terms can be developed.

    LNG Costs & Innovation

    The current liquefaction boom which started in 2009 initiated the largest capacity build-up in the history of LNG, but it was also accompanied by a steep increase in liquefaction construction costs. In order for LNG to remain competitive against other fuels and gas supplies, these costs have to come back down. Although there may be no silver-bullet, what innovative options deserve further examination?

    Europe’s Future Gas Supplies

    Demand for gas in Europe may not grow significantly in the future, but Europe will still remain an attractive market for gas suppliers. Indigenous production will continue to decline, and therefore the need for imports will continue to rise in the future. What is the future of European gas and what is the strategic choice for suppliers and buyers?

  • 12:45pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    12:45pm - 2:05pm
    Luncheon & Keynote

    Luncheon & Keynote

  • 2:15pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    2:15pm - 3:25pm
    Ministerial Plenary Dialogue

    Ministerial Plenary Dialogue

  • 3:35pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    3:35pm - 4:45pm
    Concurrent Plenaries

    Gas Markets Plenary

    Midstream Plenary

  • 5:00pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    5:00pm - 6:15pm
    Plenary

    The Future of Americas E&P Plenary

  • 6:20pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    6:20pm - 7:30pm
    Conference Wide Reception

  • 7:30pm
    Wednesday, 24 February
    7:30pm - 9:15pm
    Insight Dinners

    CERAWeek Insight Dinners provide a relaxed and informal opportunity for discussion among industry peers and experts. Each dinner centers on a key theme and features thought provoking remarks by distinguished commentators, followed by moderated discussion and Q&A with dinner participants. CERAWeek Insight Dinners are open to all CERAWeek delegates, but seating at each is limited and on a first come first served basis. These sessions are closed to the media.

    Women Leaders in Energy

    This year’s IHS CERAWeek speakers and attendees include women who lead energy company upstream and downstream operations, government agencies, and financial entities. Yet women still represent only a small minority of board members and a smaller fraction of CEOs. The panel will explore the role of women as leaders in the energy industry. Who are they? How do they lead? And what opportunities will there be for women leaders in the future?

    US Energy Policy in an Election Year & Beyond

    What challenges will the 2016 election year present for U.S. energy policy, globally and domestically, what role will it play inthe election campaign and for the new US President?

    • How should we understand election rhetoric on energy? What is real behind the surface?
    • Can the United States modernize its pipeline infrastructure, or did oil and gas transit infrastructure die with Keystone?
    • Does the Supreme Court freeze on the Clean Power Plan unravel U.S. climate commitments at Paris and, if so, what does that mean for the geopolitics of climate change?
    • Can the U.S. manage the Sunni/Shia oil wars for market share, keep the Iran nuclear agreement alive, and retain traditional alliances with Saudi Arabia, UAE and Kuwait?
    • Does the U.S. have leverage through energy policy, and if it does, how should it be used?

    Smart Cities, Smart Homes: The Customer of the Future

    The pace of urbanization around the world is accelerating by the minute. By 2050, about 70% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas. Over 60% of the land projected to become urban by 2030 is yet to be built. Reducing the resource intensity of urbanization presents one of the biggest opportunities to tackle climate change while enabling economic growth. In parallel to growing urbanization, the accelerating trend towards integration of the “virtual” with the “physical” due to the advent of new technologies could provide cost effective solutions to improve quality of life, meet the needs of the residents and help reduce carbon footprint. This dinner will explore the convergence of new technologies and urbanization to understand the customer of the future, and what this means for energy.

    Cyber-Security & The Digital Transformation: The Promise & the Peril

    The energy industry is adopting connected technologies and artificial intelligence systems at a rapid pace. At the same time, greater connectivity and integration of assets is exposing the industry to ever greater threats from cyber attacks. This dinner will address the promise and peril of digital transformation, and how companies are approaching the new challenges presented by the connection world of the future:

    • What strategies and actions are being taken to build energy system resilience against increasingly severe cyber threats?
    • How can companies deal with the harsh reality that adversaries may already be inside their networks?
    •  What lessons can energy learn from the experiences and practices of other infrastructure sectors?
    • What is the role of government in energy resilience, and how can government and industry more effectively collaborate?

    Clean Power Plan: What Now?

    The United States Supreme court ordered a stay of the EPA Clean Power Plan implementation on February 9th. Four possible scenarios capture what is likely to happen next. First, the courts may simply delay CPP implementation by a couple of years. Second, the EPA may have to reformulate its electricity sector CO2 emission regulations and roll out new proposed rules a few years down the road. Third, limited Federal regulation of electric sector CO2 emissions may take a back seat to a patchwork of state initiatives. Fourth, the limits on EPA actions may force new Federal climate legislation. This dinner discussion will explore these possible pathways and assess the impacts on the pace of change in the fuels and technologies employed to supply US electricity demands.

    Future of Solar: The Next Frontiers of Growth

    New additions of solar PV capacity worldwide have increased for ten consecutive years. This session will explore the emerging frontiers for solar growth -- from utility scale to distributed generation to off-grid electrification -- and the implications for energy and geopolitics.

  • 7:30am
    Thursday, 25 February
    7:30am - 8:40am
    Breakfast & Strategic Dialogues

    Strategic Dialogues provide insights and presentations on key strategic topics; followed by interactive discussion among the presenters and between session participants and panelists.

    How Europe is Managing its Energy Transition: Lessons Learned

    Over 266 GW of renewables capacity have been added in Europe since 2000 and the region is expected to add more than 309 GW over the next 16 years led by wind and solar technologies. This will be over twofold the capacity added in the US within the same period. By 2030, renewables including hydro will account for over 45% of the region’s total power generation, compared to 18% in the US. Intermittent renewable generation on this scale will require all sections of the power system— distribution, generation and transmission— to become much more flexible. The IHS base case planning scenario expects the transformation to cost almost US $1 trillion through 2030. This session will focus on the opportunities and challenges associated with this ongoing build out of capacity by exploring: How will incumbent players adapt to this new reality? How will transmission and distribution system operators integrate a significant amount of distributed and intermittent generation in flat demand growth markets? How will mature renewables technologies compete with conventional generation sources? How will this energy transition be financed?

    North America: Power Logistics & the New Fuel Dynamic

    The relative cost of coal and gas has shifted radically creating a rivalry to serve power generation demand. The logistics of the two fuels are somewhat different and while this shift has provided benefits and opportunities, it also has introduced new dynamics, complexities, and risks to the fuel delivery systems and optionality/reliability of the power grid. This strategic dialogue will consider how the growing role of natural gas in power generation has created structural and operational challenges for the railroads, coal buyers and sellers, and for power generators trying to ensure firm fuel supply and a reliable power grid.

    Electricity Consumers: What Do They Want?

    Consumer behaviors often reveal consumer preferences that differ from the conventional wisdom. This session will focus on consumer actions regarding the willingness to pay more for clean energy, the desire to access real time consumption information and value of reliability in electric service.

    The Future of Asia’s Power Markets: Redefining Fuel Competition

    The next phase of Asia’s power market expansion will significantly impact plans for energy resource developments worldwide and long term climate goals. As global fuel markets face structural oversupply, a sizeable quantity of LNG and coal will be looking to compete for existing as well as uncontracted Asian power demand. The growing appetite for renewables, concerns over air quality, and the need to manage generation costs and subsidies present further challenges. What are the evolving power business models, market structures, policies, and technology options across Asia’s established and most promising power markets; and the opportunities, challenges, and risks for fuel marketers, project developers and investors?

    Texas Power: Shaping the Future

    Texas leads the nation in transitioning its power system for the future. Environmental regulations, renewable resources, and ensuring the reliability of the electrical grid are key issues confronting the region. This session will engage policymakers and stakeholders directly involved in shaping the future of the region’s power market.

    EPA’s Clean Power: Managing Uncertainty

    The US EPA issued the final rule for power plant carbon emissions in August 2015, known as the Clean Power Plan (CPP). Twenty seven states have filed lawsuits opposing the new rule; eighteen have filed arguments supporting it. Despite the uncertainty of its final disposition, many states are working with stakeholders in preparing State Implementation Plans. On 9 February 2016, the US Supreme Court ordered a stay of the CPP implementation until the completion of the judicial review. Panelists from state regulatory agencies and major utilities will discuss their strategies and actions in managing the CPP amid legal uncertainties, possible evolution of the CPP, what state and federal policies may be implemented beyond the CPP, and how the power generation mix, fuel consumption, and carbon emissions may evolve over the coming decades.

    Latin America Renewables Heating Up

    Latin America has long been defined as one of the least carbon intensive power markets. Strengthened clean energy policies in Chile, Mexico, Colombia, Argentina, and Brazil point to continued renewables growth across the region. Meanwhile, many of the region’s most hydro dependent markets including Brazil and Colombia have struggled with the impacts of prolonged droughts and are looking at innovative approaches to attract more investment in dispatchable thermal resources to stabilize their power system. How will each market balance meeting its clean generation goals while also attracting sufficient thermal investors? Which technologies and development strategies are best positioned? Does a renewables boom drive the need for additional thermal investments or emerge as a competitor for share in the generation mix?

  • 8:50am
    Thursday, 25 February
    8:50am - 9:55am
    Plenary Dialogue

    North American Power CEO Plenary

  • 9:55am
    Thursday, 25 February
    9:55am - 10:25am

    Electric Power at the Crossroads: A Global View

  • 10:25am
    Thursday, 25 February
    10:25am - 11:25am
    Plenary Dialogue

    Power Markets, Policy & Technology Plenary

  • 11:25am
    Thursday, 25 February
    11:25am - 11:55am
    CEO Dialogue

    Global Power Dialogue

  • 12:05pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    12:05pm - 1:15pm
    Strategic Dialogues

    Strategic Dialogues provide insights and presentations on key strategic topics; followed by interactive discussion among the presenters and between session participants and panelists.

    Future of Coal: When is the Upturn?

    Coal markets have slumped into recession of a depth not seen since the 1990s, raising the hopes of some opponents to coal that the industry is at last moving into terminal decline. However, there will remain a vibrant and growing market for coal, while there are already signs emerging of the recovery that is to come. This session focuses on the causes of the industry’s current ills and on what is already being done to address them, providing a guide to the survival of price recession that many players in the oil and gas industries might find useful for their future planning.

    Power System & Grid Operations: Keeping the Lights on Through an Era of Change

    The falling cost of wind, solar, battery storage, and energy management technology signals an era of change for power system planning and operations. Renewables introduce more variability into a system which must be carefully balanced at all times; batteries and automated demand management devices offer the possibility of much more granular, precise control. This session will focus on the coordination requirements emerging as transmission and distribution networks incorporate more demand-side management, distributed generation and storage technologies.

    New Power Technologies: Innovating to Meet the Climate Change Imperative

    When it comes to addressing climate change, the power sector is widely expected to do much of the heavy lifting. Recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind, solar, and battery storage, as well as a proliferation of new IT-enabled demand-side technologies are reinforcing that view and prompting additional questions. What’s next on the technology horizon? How are models of innovation evolving in the face of new market realities like low fuel prices and reduced risk tolerance? And what are effective company strategies for evaluating and adopting emerging technologies? This session will explore these questions and provide an on-the-ground perspective from a panel of leading practitioners, including members of the 2016 Class of Energy Innovation Pioneers.

    The Power Generation Mix: Balancing Cost, Security, & the Environment

    Flexibility is one of the most valuable things about electric power. Just about anything containing energy can be turned into electricity—coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, wood chips, sunlight, wind, ocean waves, biomass, trash—even used tires. Around the globe countries with abundant or scarce resources face challenges balancing multiple objectives when managing power generation mix. Panelists from Japan, UAE, and the US will discuss their power generation mix issues and targets, key uncertainties, policies and market structure deployed in managing the mix, and lessons learned.

    Electric Market Structure: Continued Evolution

    North American power systems are responding in a variety of ways to the challenge implementing the right mix of market forces and regulatory processes to shape power sector outcomes. This session will compare and contrast the evolution of power industry structures in the North America.

    Renewable Power: Expectations for Scale

    As wind and solar costs fall, policymakers are setting more ambitious targets for renewables growth. This session will focus on the drivers and challenges of scale for the renewable power sector. What are effective policies and regulatory frameworks for stimulating renewables investment? What are the changes that renewable power expansion is forcing in the operation of power systems? What are the implications for fuel competition on a global scale?

    Electric Power Finance: Balancing Risk & Return

    Power sector capital requirements are growing as interest rates move up from historically low levels and policy initiatives gain more traction. This session focuses on managing the risks and reward trade-offs in the future electric power investment climate.

  • 1:25pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    1:25pm - 2:35pm
    Luncheon & Keynote

    Luncheon & Keynote

  • 2:45pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    2:45pm - 3:45pm
    Plenary

    Climate Change Plenary: What’s Ahead?

  • 3:45pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    3:45pm - 4:10pm
    Plenary Dialogue

    Presidential Dialogue

  • 4:25pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    4:25pm - 5:35pm
    Plenary

    Infrastructure & Technology Plenary: The Shape of Things to Come

  • 5:50pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    5:50pm - 6:30pm
    IHS Expert Discussions

    IHS Expert Discussions provide presentations and outlooks by IHS analysts followed by interactive discussions. Each session provides insight on strategies, risk, and opportunities in a key energy area.  

    Asia & COP21: Which Future Fuel Choices for Asia’s Power Sector?

    The world’s largest and fastest growing power markets in Asia are evolving rapidly. The region continues to depend heavily on coal, with China building 60 GW of new coal-fired power last year alone and South Korea, Indonesia, and India alike also with aggressive new coal programs. But with climate change obligations becoming increasingly evident for emerging Asia, where some of the world’s largest emitters are, there are critical questions regarding future fuel choices in China, India, Southeast Asia, and Northeast Asia. In this session IHS experts will share their latest insights on how different drivers in different countries are leading to changes in Asia’s power sector development, and outline key risks and opportunities for project developers, fuel suppliers, equipment suppliers, and engineering/construction companies.

    North America Shale Gas Reloaded: Markets Perspective

    The evolving shale gas resource base in North America continues to expand and drop in cost. Shale Gas Reloaded, IHS Energy’s thorough reassessment of the resource base in the US Lower 48 and Canada, concludes that 1400 Tcf of natural gas is recoverable at a break even Henry Hub price of $4/MMBtu or less. This represents a 66% increase from a 2010 IHS Energy estimate that more than 900 Tcf could be produced at a $4/MMBtu breakeven price, after accounting for the 176 Tcf of gas produced during 2010-15. This has profound long-term producer and consumer implications for North American and global natural gas markets.

    Latin America Gas & Power Trends

    Latin American faces several power market challenges, including weakening demand, meeting renewable energy targets, and the viability of new LNG-to-wire developments across the region. This session will focus on these issues and other emerging opportunities in the gas and power sectors across Latin America.

    North American Power Trends

    Transformation of the US electric power sector is underway. 2015 was a record year on many fronts: a decade low in average natural gas prices, retirement of approximately 5% of the coal-fleet, an increase of over 40% in solar PV installed capacity and several significant policy milestones. IHS Energy experts will share their views on key policies and associated implications (including the recent extension of renewable tax credits and the fate of the Clean Power Plan) and market fundamentals that will further shape the power sector in the decade ahead.

    Energy Infrastructure Security

    Energy infrastructure is increasingly at risk, particularly in the Middle East but also elsewhere. More actors in command of more and better capabilities are generating a diverse range of security challenges for which private companies and government organizations need to prepare. This session will assess current and emerging risks emanating from geopolitical competitions, sovereignty challenges, non-state armed groups, emerging technologies and cyber. It will also introduce intelligence methods and techniques useful for mitigating risks and anticipating new threats in uncertain and complex environments.

    IHS Outlook for Fuel Prices & Inter-Fuel Competition

    The end of the great commodity super cycle has left excess supply across the entire energy spectrum setting up a global race to the bottom featuring inter- and intra-fuel rivalries with significant economic and geopolitical ramifications. IHS Experts will explore the key issues, rivalries, and price expectations for natural gas, oil, coal, and LNG globally. They will answer the questions: How does the inter-fuel rivalry play out in Europe; Is there a future for coal?; Is the United States the global swing supplier for oil?; Does Asia demand hold the keys to future global energy prices?; Does Henry Hub become the new global benchmark?; Will the United States gas/oil dynamic keep global oil and gas connected?

    Two Part Harmony: Mexico, US Gas & Power Dynamics

    Just as the “shale gale” reinforces the interdependence between the US natural gas and power sector, it is also reinforcing the Mexico’s dependence on imports as a cheap alternative to power its economy. Likewise, as Mexico continues to forge ahead with its energy reforms, the transformation of the natural gas sector will significantly influence the power markets evolution. The challenge of this two part harmony is coordination---gas-electric coordination, and coordination between countries.

    Power Generation & Storage Technology Trends

    Major technological changes are occurring in power supply for both generation and storage of electricity to magnitudes not seen for some time. Gas turbine technology improvements are resulting in higher performance both in efficiency and flexibility and at a lower cost per unit. Battery storage is evolving rapidly relative to pervious decades enable by the synergies with transportation applications. Solar and wind continue to experience performance improvements driven by advances in manufacturing and innovative applications of data analytics resulting in lower electricity costs. In this session we will explore these trends and the impact it is having on transforming the power sector.

    North American Gas & Power Scenarios: Incorporating Policy Risk in Strategic Planning

    Environmental and energy policy uncertainty is a dominant risk factor in North America’s power and gas markets. In this interactive session we will outline how IHS approaches this key risk factor in the scenarios and the strategic implications for market participants.

  • 6:30pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    6:30pm - 7:30pm
    Conference Wide Reception

  • 7:30pm
    Thursday, 25 February
    7:30pm - 9:30pm
    Dinner & Technology Keynote

    Dinner & Technology Keynote

  • 7:30am
    Friday, 26 February
    7:30am - 8:30am
    Breakfast & Dialogue

    Reflections on CERAWeek 2016: Where Do We Go from Here?

  • 8:30am
    Friday, 26 February
    8:30am - 9:20am
    Plenary Dialogue

    Demographics & the Second Machine Age

  • 9:20am
    Friday, 26 February
    9:20am - 10:00am
    Plenary Dialogue

    Prospects for the Middle East & the World

  • 10:20am
    Friday, 26 February
    10:20am - 11:30am
    MIT Plenary@CERAWeek

    Frontiers of Science & Innovation: Future Technologies to Meet the Energy & Climate Challenge

  • 11:30am
    Friday, 26 February
    11:30am - 12:30pm
    Plenary Dialogue

    The US & Global Energy Future: Policy Plenary

  • 12:30pm
    Friday, 26 February
    12:30pm - 1:15pm
    Networking Lunch